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现金扎金花

时间:2020-05-29 05:02:58作者:Mckay

导语:在线领A片【AG88.SHOP】现金扎金花\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures”
现金扎金花High-c【】lass】 insect dishes【 from New Yor【k“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Text sizeA【aAa/C【16 Bioscie/nces is the 【New York based/【 s\tartup producing a synthetic vers】ion of\ 】palm oil that\ doesn&\rs】quo;t rely on defore【station. The compan\y has j】ust recei】【ved a 20 millio】/n d】ollar 'series A' invest】m\ent round from Bill Gates’ Breakthrough /Energy Vent【\ure\s fund.\The \inve\stor-l/ed fun】d\ sup/ports 】cut】ting edge startups wi/t】h【 a focus on en\vironmental innovation an【d sustainabil【ity. Hence, the decision to invest in conflict-free palm /oi/l【 goes hand in \hand \with its commitment to /】/b】ack 】"companies that 【will help stop clim】a\te change." A\ 'series A' inve/s】tment is】 usually offered to a】 business/ which has alrea】dy develo【p】ed \a trac/k record /of success, as 【o/pposed to 'pre-seed' or 'seed' stages of funding which occur ear】lier in a company's lifesp【an.The synthetic pa//lm oi\l produced by C16 Biosciences /i】s /bio-based \】and \is brewed from microb/es throug】h a/ fermentation process【.Est&eacu\te】;e】 Lauder launch】es sus【tai】【na/ble scheme to tackle palm oil prod/\uctionMa【laysia/n sup\ermarket fights back to】/ ‘pr【ot】ect/ the re/putation’ of palm o\i/lForest fires /prove eco-friendly palm oil/ 'is a 【c/on'/】, says Greenpea】ce\Palm oil alternat\ive brewed like beerPalm oil exists in the【 majorit/y】 of ho【use【hold /produ】cts b\oug\ht in the】\ supermarket, \f/rom frozen piz/\zas and biscu/i\ts to sham/poo【, toothpaste a】n\d lipstick. While it is 】a versatile /vegetable \oil, deriving from/ th/e fruit o】f \oil-palm tre/es, it is one o\f the majo】r drive【rs o/f【 deforestation wo【rldwide, according to/ WWF. Destroying the world’s for\ests in order to 】obtain【\ 【it is/ not only w\r/ecking】 wildli】fe\ habitats, home to orangutans,/ elephants an】【d rh【inos, it is 】remo【vin【】g the ability of trees/ to absorb car】bon 】emi/ssions.Most cosm】\etic prod【ucts contain palm/ oilUnsplashFor \a】 concerne】d team at C16 Biosciences, there see【med like no o【\ther opti\on but to come \up with a 【【sust\ainable\【【 oil【 alternative to roll ou】t on a la】rge scale. "\We came up /with the i】dea beca【use we wit/nesse/d the mass/【ive scale【 of destruct/ion caused by palm oil deforestation first-hand," CEO Shara Ticku tells Eurone/ws Living."I was working i】n Sing】apore in 2013, which wa】s one of the worst ye】ars\ on re】cor】d for the 】fi【res in I【nd/onesia. T】he Air Quality Index (A】QI) was over 400, and over 0】 is c\onside/red】 toxic, a】nd pregnant women were restricted from goin\g outsi/de," she \continues. Shara says sh\e soon learnt that th/ese\ conseque\nces were d】irectly 】caused by \the need to】 clea【r the land\ for 】palm /o【il/ p】lantations and 【s/a\ys, "I simpl\y couldn't understand how we【 just】ified burning the planet to ma/】ke a v【egetable【 oil.】"As a/ resu【lt, C16 Biosc\】iences was born and Sh/ar\】a started /bre【win\g p/alm /oil li/k\e beer usin/g biotechnology. The company【 state,【 “fermentation is a well-pr】oven commercia【】l process tha】t has been used f\or c【enturies to convert raw mate】ri\als】 into consumable co】mmercia\l pro】ducts】 consumed by】 billions of /people【\ every d【\ay,” addin/g “our\ palm oil is sustainable.&r/dquo;I\n an offi【cial statement】, Carmichae\l R【/\o\berts of Break/through Energy Vent【ures, call】\【s the produc/t a\n【 "elegant bioman/ufacturing solut/ion /for p/alm oi【l r/eplacement" claiming that /it puts the c\ompany in a go\/od position to capi【tali【s】e on t】he “】growing need for sustainable, low-carbon bio-substitutes.”Will the alterna】tives ever re【plac【e t】he original?S/u/stainable palm【 o\il【 has \b\een criticised of late\ by The\ Ro】undtable on【 Sustaina/ble Palm】 Oil】 (RSPO) as &\ldquo;\a】 con” as there are q】uestions aroun】d how the oil can\ be grown in an environ/men/t\ally friendly way.P】alm 【oil that is grown and certified ag\ain】st the eight RSPO pri】nci】ples is based】 on stringent sustainability 】crit【eria relating to s/ocial, en/vironmental and eco/nomic good practice. But in November 2019【, Greenpeace relea\sed /its Bur】】ning Down /】the House rep\【or/t,【 finding that\ memb【ers of the /【RSPO had been at the centre of a /series of Indonesi\an forest f】】ires.\Fo【rest \of pal\m treesUnspl/ashAs a result, synthetically produ\ced palm oil might be an】 】improved s】o【l】ution. “Sus/tainabl/【e certification schemes and zero-deforestation commitments from big agri【business have fail\ed t】o【 live up】 to the/ hype,&rdqu/o; conf】irms J\oe Ei/sen, Executive Direct\o】r/ of the】 Rai【nforest /Foundation UK.&/ldquo;】Alternatives such as C16 【Biosciences c/an be part of 】the/ solution but th/ere are no】 gua\rantees】 this can be a like-for-like replacemen】t for cheap and di\rty palm oil from tropical f\orests. [] Care must 】also \【b/e paid to the possible impacts on\ mill【ions of smaller-holders for whom pal/m 】oil is a 】main sourc【e of】 livelihood,&rdquo【; he concludes.Anna Jones, He【ad// of 】Fo\rest/s at Greenpeace\ UK con【curs, sayi\ng t/hat the \charity is "not against/ u/【s【ing new tech【nol】ogies to p/r/oduce \food including palm oil" provided that the \techniqu【es 【and raw mate】ri\als used "do/ not negat/ively impact the envi\ronment or peopl【e."Share this\ art【ic】le More f/rom】 life twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsGra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \

Will L\eon】ardo DiCaprio open his new eco-resort in Belize in\ 2020?° vid/eo:\ how B/elgium i【s trainin】g \the fishermen of tomorrow

\The sout\h-west Africa】n /country of An/gola is wakin】g up to /its\ tour/ism potenti/al, offering opportunitie/s for vi【sitor【\s and /in【vestor\s a【lik【e./One of the】 most unspo\ilt regions\ is th】e Namibe deser/t, wh/ich/\ stretches 2,000 kil【ometr】es acr【o\ss t】hree countri【es.T【he dese\rt runs all 】the way from t/he/ Iona Nation\al Park in A】\ngola, t】hrough/【 Namib【【ia, to South Af\ric\a&r】squo;s 】Kalahari Desert - more 【than 80,000】 square kilometres. You \can\ drive for hour/s along the Corridor of the Tides, where the desert meets the ocean.N】a/m\ib】e mean】s ‘’vast pla\ce’&rsquo【;\ in the local la\ng/uage and it lives up【 to its name &/nd【ash; a tourism wonderl【and with a s\p\ect】acula\r coastlin【e.A\ndrea\ Mar【tins【【 runs an eco-touris】m lodge perched abo【ve a 】grotto on the Atlantic Oc】ean. Praia do \Soba, meaning &lsqu\o;Beach of the Chief’, offe【/rs mag【/nificent view【s of sandstone \cliff/s c】/arve\d by na【ture.【Mar】ti【ns says】 the locatio【n was dis/cov\ered by her f\ather and\ the【 family/ decided to inv】est there.She comp】/a\r/es her adventuro/us fat\her to the movie character Crocodile Dundee.“This wa\s the\ l】a】/st lost paradise of】 Angola】, beca】use no one fo/und this 【plac【e, becau\s【e there was】\ no road, /no/ access, and my Crocodile 【Dundee, m【y father, the/ Ango】lan Crocod/ile Du】】ndee, arr\ived here, he m【ade】 a road, an】d he found this amazi】ng place.&rdq】uo/;The ind】i】vidual hut【s are //beautif【ully decorated, and there are plans to build more. The/re are also plans to provide luxury campsites for so-cal】led glam/ping tourism.Marti【ns tol【d Business Angola: “W\e 】want t/o make a bigger r】e/staurant, a conference room,/ more rooms and we want to (【do) glamping, to have【 al【l kinds of people here.&rd\/quo;Martin Bremer, a S/out/h African businessman, already ru】】/ns】 a g】lamping compa【【ny, giving tourists 【a/ chance to t【ravel dee【【p into the heart of Nami】be\ pro/vi【nce.Bremer\ has travelle】d extensiv】ely th【rough southern Africa as part\ of his stone business.&】ldq/uo;We visited all sorts of &l【squo\;off the beaten track’ (places), a】ll the uncha\rted sites. And i】t was just a\ n/a\/tural thi\ng to do to bring p【eople into this area./”Bremer/ says co【mp\ared to /other countri【es in southe/rn Africa, An【gola is ripe for investm】ent in tourism.&l【dquo;It【's op】e\n, 】it's becoming much easier to for【m partnerships. They】've changed m\any of the la\【ws to make it ea【sier for /people t\o invest. There ar/e great c【ompan/ies in Angola.”It&rsquo/\;s hope/d【 a/ 500 mi【l/l【ion-euro expansion of the southe\rn port of Namibe\ w】ill have flow-on eff【/ects for t/ourism a】nd \leisure.Japanese company Toyota is be【hi\nd the investment, wh\ich will 】doub\le the size /of the】【 po】rt, connect\ed to the region by rail, while adding tou\rism and lei/sure facilities.Nuno Borges da Silva, \Chairman of \Toyo\ta Angola, told Business An【gol\a: “The port will /be a big support fo【r tourism/ ves【se\ls】, because】【 now they 】don't hav】e conditions/ to 【bring vessels and tour【i【sts. But w/hen this p【ort【 is ready it wil/l be very beautif/ul, and y/ou can al\so d【oc】k b】ig vessels.&r】【dq】/uo;【He said for【eigners can invest \in An\gola without any local/ partners.&ld【quo;Let'】s say it's more open to the peop【le to come and \invest w【ithout any difficulty, a\ny problem,【” he said.【Sha【re this articleC【/opy/pas\te the/ article video embed link be/low:CopyShareTweetShar\esendShareTweetSharesendMor【e【Hide\Share【SendS【】hareShar/eShareSen】\dSh【/a】reSh\ar\e【More aboutTouri/smFauna and】 Fl/oraEnvironment\al prot】ectionAn\golaAfrica Bro【wse today�】【;s /t【ag】sT/ake a\】 l【ook 】at】【 the plastics o/f the f/uture,见下图

M\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea lifeFinance going greenT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【lacesOur s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】ste。现金扎金花

Global energy\ demand\ debated at A】/\bu Dha/bi Sustain】abilit\y WeekAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesWi\th/ the Europ\ean Union’s】 focus on the climate action and the EU\ G【reen D\eal, Commissioner \for Envir【on】ment, Oceans【 and F【is/h/e【ries \Virginijus Sinke/vič/;ius is la【unching a /new/ 【Global Coalition for Bi【odiversit【y\ at Wor【ld Wild Life Day in】\【 Monaco.The youngest Com】missio】ner at the Eu\ropean Union, Lith】uanian S【inkevi&【#2/69;ius was a member of \Lithuania【n【 Parliament and Minister of the /Ec【/onomy and In\】no【va/tion o【f the Republic of Lithuania be【fo】re t【aking the p】ost a】t t】he E【uro】pean Commission.【Now charged with finding European solu\tions to the worsening /c】limate and ecological crisis, he spoke to Euronews' busine】ss edito【r,\ Sas】ha Vakulina about what is re】qu\ired to turn climate change and bio【d】【】ivers【ity\ loss around.Tell us【【\ a b【it more a】bout th【e Global Coalition for /Biodiversity and 】what is its role\ wh【en/ it comes to the bigger E\U e/n/】vironment】】al agenda?\I think we hav】e a\chieved\ terrific succes\s 【in rec【【e【nt years launching/ similar campai/gns on marin\e litte\r, on plast\【ic pollution in our oceans. Now ha】vin】g【 \thi/s year/ 】being devote【d to biodiversity, it is time to\ raise awareness about /biodiversity loss. The science is very 】】clear:/ 【out of 8 million as/】sesse\d – /1 mi\llion are at risk of extinction. We ha\ve to halt biod/】iversity loss caused /by 【the human activ】ities. \The b】e【st tool to /do so is a societ/y which is mobilized, which supp【orts certai【n decisions, which leads us to me\et/ing ho【pefully in Oc/tober/ in China【 /to 【r】each a global 【agr//e/ement equal t】o t\he P】aris \Accord reached in 201】6.And latest Euro-bar】ometer 【shows us 94% o【f Europeans care about environment【 /\p【r/otectio】n\ – 【it is a clear signal for politicians to【 act. A】nd I am tru【l\y p/roud that the】 European Commissio\n did so from t\he very \first days, introducing our flagship initiative &ndash\】; the Eur】opean Gr/een Deal.With the bi/g social movement over the past year, i/ncluding Frida\ys fo】r Fu】\tur【e, there has been a big focus on/ the climate /and /ecological crisis. Should【 focu/s shift to/wards【 biodi\/vers【【ity?【To\ b\e honest we don\&rsq【uo;t need \to c】\h\ange t\he】 focus. Climate change is \important and significa】nt 【to be a/ware of. And I a【m 【truly happ【y th】at we\ finally reached the】 point that w//hen you ask people in t/he \st/reet, they w\ill explai】n climate change to you. I think we have to do the same great work raising awareness about \biod】iver/s\ity. Because\ if y】ou lo/ok at the solution for stopping climate change/ and/ glob/al warming, on/\e third/ of it i/s in having a healthy ecosystem of biodiv【/ersity【 &n】d\ash; healt/【hy 【oceans\, seas, la】nd】】【, forest - everythin/g around\ us is/ biodiversity】】. 】And, of course, th】ose 】specie\s whi【c【h not o【nly 【keep o【ur nature alive, but also put food on our】 table【】s.The Eu】ropean Union has clearly put 【the Green D】e】al on】\ top on its age\nda. What is the 'blue' element \of the bigger Green\ 】Deal Pict】ur/e?That is 】correct. P【art of my\ work is to make the Green deal blue. By【 protectin】g biodiversit【y we canno【t speak only about protecting sp\ecies or\ protectio/\n of l/and, soil or fores】t. We【 also have to address oceans. That is \why this year it is/ going t】o 【be c【rucially important /】\to als】o reach a global agreement on \/protection of the high seas】,\ which today, \is not being ful/ly implemented.EU budget talks o【r M\ult】ia\nnual /Fin/a//ncial Framework (MFF) \talks are on/ /amid pr】essu【re for more climate action. What are 】your expectations a/nd what 】are your priori\ties th\】a【t/ y\ou want to see fr】om the MFF?】F【irst o\f all, pro【bably, the Commissi【on would like to see agreement. We /can/no【t a//fford delay and that would be, pro】bably, /th\e worst outcome.S】econdly,】 】o】f course, if /we \are to seriou\sly step \u\p effort on biodive】rsity protectio】n, on t/he Green Deal, it has【 to be su】fficien】tly funded. I a】m glad to see that that call\ has 【been heard【, bu\t most imp】ortant】】 is th\e part on subsidies. S【ubsi【【die】s, payme/nts\, which \go directl【y from/ the EU budget, fro\m different en/velope/s – they 】also have to /be in\】 line 】with the 】Gree/n Deal and the/y can】not enhance】 biodiversity loss or stimulate climate change.W\e have \to be sure that/ certain activ/i\ties do/\n’t cause environmenta\l loss, because it \would be ve\/ry strange if on the\ one han/d we increase【 】funding for b】iodiversity pro/t】ection, but on the other hand we fund certa【in \a】ctivities /that cause biodiversity lo【ss【.Y【ou’/ve touc\hed upon challenges and the i/mporta】【nt thi】n【\gs t/o do this year, what a【bout th\e Brexit s】】itu\ation when i】t comes to fisheries/【?Ne】go【tiations \just started and w\e are ready to t】alk. And I think if we are going to】 have a d\ialog【 where we/ are ready to mee/t each other, we a【re\ going 】to h】ave\ /a result tha】t is satisfying to all. The most imp【or【tant rea/lly 】i【s to com/e】 with \willingne\ss to find an /agreement.The /Fisheries agreement is th【e only one th【at's time bo\und, /it is a 【very short time. Let/’/s begin.\【 We a\re ready,\ I know the B\ritish /side as well. We 】will work tirelessly to find the best agreement/.【As a\【 former Mi/nister for the Economy and\ 【Innovation \in Lithuania, how does t/his 】experien/ce influence your job now as EU Co/mmissioner for Environment, Oceans and /Fisheries?On】e of t\he\ key \initia/tives tha/t we a\re g】oi/ng 【to a】/nnounce on the 11 March is t\he 】Cir【cular\ 【Economy A】\c\ti\on pl\an. It has various elements fro】m product policy to business 】and small/】 and medium enter】prise/ (SME) in【volvement. Beca/use if we are successful 【in imple\menting a \c/ircular econ\omy and 】changing\ current economic activities, if we to manage decoup\le grow【th from extract】i/on of resources, we can be very s【ucces\sful at halting biodivers】it】y loss. Bec【ause biodiversity loss is mainly【 due to extractio\n of resources which put enor/mous pr\essure on o】ur envi【】r【onment.T】h/ere is this aspect of transitio/【n 】a【s well when it comes 【to these\ new】 polic/ie【s. 【What is your\ take/ on that\?It i\s v/】ery \im\portant and \from the very b【eginning the【 Commi/ssion was vocal t\hat n\obod/y can be left \behin/【d.】 It i\s imp【ort】ant to mention that G】r】ee】n 【Deal i【s a g】rowth st】rategy 【and 】growth m\eans not t【o hold the amb】ition, but also help those, who are still not the】re. \An】d I think】 】the Green Deal can only be successful by/ having eve/ryone on board.An\d the final question, /you are the youngest commis【【sioner. How/ does th】】at influence your \polici\es?I a【m【 very open to communicate with everyone, wi\】th 】every Europ\ean citiz【en】 w/ho cares. 【And I think my role is to \/【raise awar/eness and 】to d\eliver./Share this articleCopy/】p】aste the article video embed link below/:Copy】ShareTwe】etSharesendShareTweet\/SharesendM\/ore\】HideShar【eSendSh【areShareShareSendShareShar】eYou 【【might also like 】 \ "No single co\untry w】ill be left behind in t】his crisi【】s&q\uot; says【 EU Commissioner for Internal Market / 【 【 / / \【 】 Fiscal support to non-Eurozone countr】ies a p】ossibil\ity as 】bloc backs\ ma【ssive coronavir【us 】rescue plan 】 【 / \ \ \【 Cor/on【avirus: an unpr】ecede/nted c】hallenge to de\mocracy? / 【 More aboutEnvi】ronmental prot】ec】tionE【U Com\missionE\uropean 】politicsMon\aco 【 Browse today's tagsThi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】l。现金扎金花

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